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teacakes:

do y’all understand how important this hair moment is?

teacakes:

do y’all understand how important this hair moment is?

(Source: dolaredola, via zimothy)

Chat
  • (I am working a morning shift at a cafe. We are serving breakfast. A little boy and his mother enter the cafe.)
  • Me: “So, what will it be?”
  • Child: “I WISH TO DEVOUR THE UNBORN.”
  • (There is a sudden silence and everyone turns to look. The mother looks very embarrassed.)
  • Mother: “Eggs… he would like some eggs…”
Tags: lol eggs
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This is when you sleep sideways across your bed.

This is when you sleep sideways across your bed.

(Source: lovelylolcats, via camunki)

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Link

divineirony:

To say, “This is my uncle,” in Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. The language requires that you denote the side the uncle is on, whether he’s related by marriage or birth and, if it’s your father’s brother, whether he’s older or younger.

“All of this information is obligatory. Chinese doesn’t let me ignore it,” says Chen. “In fact, if I want to speak correctly, Chinese forces me to constantly think about it.”

This got Chen wondering: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? In particular, Chen wanted to know: does our language affect our economic decisions?

Chen designed a study — which he describes in detail in this blog post — to look at how language might affect individual’s ability to save for the future. According to his results, it does — big time.

While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages,” like Chinese, use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Using vast inventories of data and meticulous analysis, Chen found that huge economic differences accompany this linguistic discrepancy. Futureless language speakers are 30 percent more likely to report having saved in any given year than futured language speakers. (This amounts to 25 percent more savings by retirement, if income is held constant.) Chen’s explanation: When we speak about the future as more distinct from the present, it feels more distant — and we’re less motivated to save money now in favor of monetary comfort years down the line.

But that’s only the beginning. There’s a wide field of research on the link between language and both psychology and behavior. Here, a few fascinating examples:

Navigation and Pormpuraawans
In Pormpuraaw, an Australian Aboriginal community, you wouldn’t refer to an object as on your “left” or “right,” but rather as “northeast” or “southwest,” writes Stanford psychology professor Lera Boroditsky (and an expert in linguistic-cultural connections) in the Wall Street Journal. About a third of the world’s languages discuss space in these kinds of absolute terms rather than the relative ones we use in English, according to Boroditsky. “As a result of this constant linguistic training,” she writes, “speakers of such languages are remarkably good at staying oriented and keeping track of where they are, even in unfamiliar landscapes.” On a research trip to Australia, Boroditsky and her colleague found that Pormpuraawans, who speak Kuuk Thaayorre, not only knew instinctively in which direction they were facing, but also always arranged pictures in a temporal progression from east to west.

Blame and English Speakers
In the same article, Boroditsky notes that in English, we’ll often say that someone broke a vase even if it was an accident, but Spanish and Japanese speakers tend to say that the vase broke itself. Boroditsky describes a study by her student Caitlin Fausey in which English speakers were much more likely to remember who accidentally popped balloons, broke eggs, or spilled drinks in a video than Spanish or Japanese speakers. (Guilt alert!) Not only that, but there’s a correlation between a focus on agents in English and our criminal-justice bent toward punishing transgressors rather than restituting victims, Boroditsky argues.

Color among Zuñi and Russian Speakers
Our ability to distinguish between colors follows the terms in which we describe them, as Chen notes in the academic paper in which he presents his research (forthcoming in the American Economic Review; PDF here). A 1954 study found that Zuñi speakers, who don’t differentiate between orange and yellow, have trouble telling them apart. Russian speakers, on the other hand, have separate words for light blue (goluboy) and dark blue (siniy). According to a 2007 study, they’re better than English speakers at picking out blues close to the goluboy/siniy threshold.

Gender in Finnish and Hebrew
In Hebrew, gender markers are all over the place, whereas Finnish doesn’t mark gender at all, Boroditsky writes in Scientific American (PDF). A study done in the 1980s found that, yup, thought follows suit: kids who spoke Hebrew knew their own genders a year earlier than those who grew up speaking Finnish. (Speakers of English, in which gender referents fall in the middle, were in between on that timeline, too.)

(via minuiko)

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Felicia Day

(Source: lietometonight, via heyfunniest)

Audio

basscannonkaplan:

In honor of Pentatonix recently passing Kanye West in YouTube Subscribers (!!!), here’s the professionally recorded version of Kanye’s “Love Lockdown”, which PTX did during Hip-Hop Week on The Sing-Off.

If you want to download this song, head on over to ptxofficial.com and join the mailing list for the free download and to keep informed with all news PTX! 

Why can’t I buy this?

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vespertineflora:

hawkules:

imagine a video game where you create a hero whose destiny is to save everyone, but throughout the game you start making harder and more questionable decisions, and the game gets darker and darker. and in the end you’re just standing there, clutching the controller and finally realizing you were playing the villain all along

   (via bluebird)

Bad Horse, the Thoroughbred of Sin

(via unitedbyindividuality)

Video

skhali:

yghigh:

Akdong Musician - Melted MV

I have not been so captured by a music video in a very, very long time. For those watching, ice and adult in Korean sound very similar, so the double meaning of this song is asking the question, ‘why are adults so cold?’

I don’t know. As a crazy person with a lot of faith in humanity that gets let down pretty often, this video really spoke to me.

Also, the fact that it was a Native American to show the protagonist kindness at the end… it was nice. As another commenter said, Native Americans certainly know what it’s like to be mistreated.

In general, I’m not used to seeing such a diverse music video, especially in the kpop scene, so this was a nice breath of fresh air.

(via colettececil)

Photoset

cogitoergosloth:

Wolf's Rain OP: Stray

"Stray!
No regrets ‘cause I got nothing to lose
Ever stray!
So I’m gonna live my life as I choose
Until I fall…”

Started singing the moment I saw the rain animation.

(via vivalamerlin)

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Meredith Stepien’s Hair Pictures. 2008-2014

(Source: savecalvinfoundation, via heyfunniest)

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out-at-nite:

lanternsonlatkes:

hooddoggy:

okay now ive seen it all. im deleting

I honestly hope I get hit by a bus today

It’s just getting out of it’s shell…

I have had this GIF sitting open on my computer the whole time I have been studying for my audit final today… It is a beautiful visual that will now forever be in my mind when I think of reporting on the financial statements.

out-at-nite:

lanternsonlatkes:

hooddoggy:

okay now ive seen it all. im deleting

I honestly hope I get hit by a bus today

It’s just getting out of it’s shell…

I have had this GIF sitting open on my computer the whole time I have been studying for my audit final today… It is a beautiful visual that will now forever be in my mind when I think of reporting on the financial statements.

(via unitedbyindividuality)

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(Source: -everdeen, via romangodfrey)

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(Source: kurtsies, via lapiarchives)

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jaechius:

A different slice of life

Ah! I am terrifying! But that fits with how you see me.

That formal portrait with baby Bethany? That is how I still see her when I think of her, probably just a bit older.  Its how I see Jen too. Driving me home from high school a few times singing along to a CD Mom gave her.